A survey of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin associated peptic ulcer bleeding in hospitals

Xia, Z.-W.; Ma, L.-L.; Yao, W.

Zhonghua Nei Ke Za Zhi 50(2): 111-115

2011


ISSN/ISBN: 0578-1426
PMID: 21418829
Document Number: 651203
To investigate the clinical characteristic and prognosis of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and aspirin associated peptic ulcer bleeding. All patients with peptic ulcer bleeding were studied by the same researcher after admission and discharge. Fifty-one cases with NSAIDs and aspirin medication of the total peptic ulcer bleeding patients (147 cases) were included (34.7%). Compared with patients not associated with NSAIDs and aspirin medication, they are older [(41.2 ± 1.9) years vs (59.4 ± 2.2) years, P < 0.001], more commonly associated with hypertension (10.4% vs 39.2%, P < 0.001), coronary heart disease (10.4% vs 17.6%, P < 0.001), diabetes (4.2% vs 19.6%, P = 0.005); and had more severe anemia (7.3% vs 23.5%, P = 0.008). Fewer patients in NSAIDs group had epigastric pain (61.5% vs 27.5%, P < 0.001), while there was more re-bleeding (9.4% vs 15.7%, P = 0.034). In all bleeding patients, factors associated with re-bleeding, surgical intervention and death included NSAIDs and aspirin medication, and low platelet count. In patients with NSAIDs and aspirin medication, re-bleeding was associated with previous ulcer history (P < 0.05). Peptic ulcer bleeding patients with NSAIDs and aspirin medication were more severe ill, and less likely to present with epigastric pain.

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