Physiological role of the pigment of the enamel in the rodent incisors. Its importance in experimental biology and medicine

Granados, H.

Archivos de Investigacion Medica 17(1): 37-54

1986


ISSN/ISBN: 0066-6769
PMID: 3813765
Document Number: 497
This paper consists of two parts: The first is an original investigation of the physiologic role of the yellow pigment of the incisor teeth enamel of rodents. The study was performed in an adequately selected experimental model, the golden hamster strain INC (of both sexes), which presents color mutants and normally exhibits various combinations of incisor teeth with and without pigment. This study has demonstrated directly in vivo, for the first time and at the international level, that the yellow pigment of the enamel of the incisors of certain groups of rodents, have the main function, if not the only one, of increasing the hardness of this tissue and of the tooth as a whole. It makes the tooth more resistant to mechanical and chemical wear. The second is a complete review of the literature on pathologic depigmentation of the enamel, caused mainly by nutritional, endocrine and toxic factors. It stresses that the importance of depigmentation is not a local pathologic change of the enamel, but consists of general pathologic events occurring elsewhere, which are important to the organism. The contents of this review is thus important to the experimentalist, who examines his laboratory rodents clinically, should remember to observe the state of the incisor pigment. This makes it possible to uncover previously undetected nutritional factors which could be causing the depigmentation. Such generalized pathologic changes, occurring concomitantly with dental depigmentation, constitute an aspect of the highest interest for experimental biology and medicine.

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Physiological role of the pigment of the enamel in the rodent incisors. Its importance in experimental biology and medicine