Morphological studies on fimbriae of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aeromonas hydrophila with special reference to their biological functions

Hashimoto, M.; Hirouchi, S.; Kosugi, J.; Kohara, W.; Nakane, M.

Bulletin of Tokyo Medical and Dental University 18(2): 105-122

1971


ISSN/ISBN: 0040-8921
PMID: 4997532
Document Number: 5515
Electron microscopic studies were performed with a series of 36 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 2 strains of Aeromonas hydrophila. Most strains of Ps. aeruginosa were found to possess bipolar fimbriae. The fimbriae of this species varied greatly in length, the short ones being considered to retain their biologic activities and the long ones being devoid of their function. By contrast, electron micrographs of A. hydrophila revealed numerous peritrichous fimbriae besides the monopolar flagellum. The fimbriae were found to be constant in length and in width. While the two Species are classified into the family Pseudomonadaceae, it may also serve as an effective clue to the characterization of these species that they differ in their pattern of fimbriation and in the number of fimbriae. The fimriae of Ps. aeruginosa were observed to be capable of adhering onto the surface of the red blood cells but fail to agglutinate them. It appears that the ability of the fimbriae to adhere onto the surface of the red blood cell (more appropriately called haemadsorption) may be related to the rosette formation and also to colony dissociation displayed by this species. The fimbriae of A. hydrophila actively agglutinate the carmine dye and yeast cells and produce only a slight agglutination of the red blood cells. These fimbriae are of the mannose-resistant type. Acid agglutination by this species occurs within the range of pH 3.4 to 3.8, and A. hydrophila remained capable of showing acid agglutination even after thermal treatment though a shift of the pH range to the acid side occurred.

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Morphological studies on fimbriae of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aeromonas hydrophila with special reference to their biological functions